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Photo#402934
Tiny green male spider - Nigma linsdalei - male

Tiny green male spider - Nigma linsdalei - Male
Stulsaft Park, Redwood City, San Mateo County, California, USA
May 30, 2010
Size: Slightly larger than 2 mm
I beat this colorful green spider from an oak tree and was surprised to see that it was an adult male at this size. Any help getting it to family would be greatly appreciated. My attempt at keying it out (apparently eight eyes, ecribellate, no leg spines and ? three claws) led me towards elongated Theridiidae or Linyphiidae again, but I could easily be wrong. One can get a sense of the palp here, but I'll try to get a better palp photo later...

Images of this individual: tag all
Tiny green male spider - Nigma linsdalei - male Tiny green male spider - Nigma linsdalei - male Tiny green male spider - Nigma linsdalei - male Tiny green male spider - Nigma linsdalei - male Tiny green male spider - Nigma linsdalei - male

Moved
Moved from Spiders.

Hint?
I'll offer a hint, because I know what species this is: we have a rather similar species here in Europe, and as you've probably already guessed, it's in the Dictynidae... :-)

-K

Of course, I could be wrong... :-)

BTW, it's already Monday evening here in Europe, so maybe the answer will come soon...

-K

 
Thanks for the hint!
My guess would then be Nigma linsdalei... This spider is really tiny and I must have missed a small cribellum - there is a very small reddish pigmented structure in that region, but I couldn't have called it a cribellum even under the highest mag on my scope... :(

 
Yep -
the palp is a perfect match to N. linsdalei - see figures 8-13 in plate 10 of the 1958 family revision by Chamberlin and Gertsch. Thanks, Kevin, and thanks for the link, John!

 
BTW, here is its European 'co
BTW, here is its European 'cousin', Nigma walckenaeria...


 
Glückwünsch!
Congratulations on your new species!

Who would have thought that this cute little green spider would be in your park? I imagine that RJ will have him/her in his California spider book (wondering how he's coming with that, btw).

I asked my Hungarian friend Walter about the blog; he says that it is written by a Hungarian fellow who is presently in the States (so perhaps working with Darryl U.?), but I didn't see his name and couldn't find any proper contact information for him.

-Kevin

Hi, Ken, I don't know what
Hi, Ken,

I don't know what it is, but by a terrific coincidence you may find the answer at this link sometime tomorrow:

http://apropok.blogspot.com/2010/05/kaliforniai-kitalalos-5.html

 
Wow -
that sure looks like the same spider! Thanks, John!

 
What luck!
Yes, be sure to let us know what the answer is.

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