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Photo#40361
Wireworm

Wireworm
Richfield, Snyder County, Pennsylvania, USA
December 31, 2005
Found inside of a log. I suppose it is a beetle larva. Can anyone ID? Thanks!

Images of this individual: tag all
Wireworm Wireworm

Moved, Alleculinae larva...

Moved
Moved from Darkling Beetles.

Moved
Moved from Click Beetles.

Or possibly tenebrionid
There's a fuzzy line between the morphologies of click beetle and darkling beetle larvae, both of which can resemble this one. If the head/mouthparts were pointed forward, I would say it's almost certainly an elaterid or click beetle. However, there are some elaterids that have a more downturned head like this one, which is also a trait of tenebrionid or darkling beetle larvae.

The outline of the segments on this one is more straight-lined than in most tenebrionids, but there are some tenebrionids that have a clean, straight-lined contour more like this one.

A view of the posterior might give us a clue on which way to go here. If it were cleanly rounded-to-pointed, it would definitely be an elaterid. If it had just two prominent up-curved hooks, it would definitely be a tenebrionid. There are other tail configurations, however, that could be from either family.

If you have a tail image, how about posting it so we can better evaluate this one.

 
Thanks!
Alright, I'll try to get a posterior shot later today. I found it at our friend’s house and I brought it home with me in case I wanted to rear it. Thanks for both of your help.

 
Done
I have uploaded a better photo. After looking, I belive it is a click beetle larva from the info you gave me. See what you think.

Wireworm
A click beetle larva. There's a few in the guide, none identified beyond family though.

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