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Photo#408620
Window Fly - Scenopinus

Window Fly - Scenopinus
Salem, Essex County, Massachusetts, USA
June 10, 2010
Size: 5 mm

Images of this individual: tag all
Window Fly - Scenopinus Window Fly - Scenopinus Window Fly - Scenopinus

Moved
Moved from Scenopinus.

Scenopinus fenestralis-group
Just to bring it down a little farther (species wouldn't be possible from a photo) - this is a member of the Scenopinus fenestralis-group.

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

Truly wild stab here...
Having looked around a bit, the closest match I found was Scenopinidae (Window Flies):



I've never seen one, know nothing about them, and am probably way off base. I'll be interested in seeing what the experts have to say (in fact, you should probably move your post to Diptera for expert attention).

 
Ken, you are right as usual!
Ken, you are right as usual! This is a small strange family of flies, with long white predatory larvae (which resemble the close related Therevidae) and the adults can be found on windows (hence the name windowflies), but the adults are not very common, sometimes you can "breed" them from twigs (where they hunt beetle larvae) or sand (where they hunt other insects...

 
Thanks
for the enlightenment, Martin!

 
Good possibility
I actually found mine on a window screen.

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