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Photo#40878
Syrphid - Copestylum lentum - female

Syrphid - Copestylum lentum - Female
Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Gardens, Claremont, Los Angeles County, California, USA
January 10, 2006
Size: ~7mm
This image, though not of the best quality, shows better the branched antennae. The branched part (arista?) looks as fleshy as the flagellum.

Images of this individual: tag all
Syrphid - Copestylum lentum - female Syrphid - Copestylum lentum - female

Moved
Moved from Copestylum lentum.

Moved
Moved from Copestylum.

Copestylum sp.
Hello Hartmut,
Nice specimen!, This is a female of Copestylum sp.! Look a bit like this one, with the same fleshy antenna:
http://bugguide.net/node/view/37852/bgimage
Greetings,
Gerard Pennards

 
Thanks, Gerard
I can see what you mean, considering the big 'schnazola' for this little fly.
I look at the male Copestylum you refer to (#37852), see the fleshy antenna, the shared light marks on the scutum. This little one on the Encelia is a bit different, probably another species.
This is the fourth species of Copestylum I've seen in the Transverse Ranges: the present one, and1,2,3.

But of course, probably just a drop in the bucket. I recall your remarks regarding 39 species in the US and Canada, and many more in central and south America.

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