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Species Rhiginia cinctiventris

Insect - Rhiginia cinctiventris Male, Rhiginia cinctiventris? - Rhiginia cinctiventris - male Male, Rhiginia cinctiventris? - Rhiginia cinctiventris - male Male, Rhiginia cinctiventris? - Rhiginia cinctiventris - male Male, Rhiginia cinctiventris? - Rhiginia cinctiventris - male Male, Rhiginia cinctiventris? - Rhiginia cinctiventris - male Male, Rhiginia cinctiventris? - Rhiginia cinctiventris - male Rhiginia cinctiventris? - Rhiginia cinctiventris
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Hemiptera (True Bugs, Cicadas, Hoppers, Aphids and Allies)
Suborder Heteroptera (True Bugs)
Infraorder Cimicomorpha
Family Reduviidae (Assassin Bugs)
Subfamily Ectrichodiinae (Millipede Assassins)
Genus Rhiginia
Species cinctiventris (Rhiginia cinctiventris)
Explanation of Names
Rhiginia cinctiventris (Stål 1872)
cinctiventris = 'with belted belly', refers to the pale margin around the abdomen
Size
18-23 mm
Identification
The concolorous black legs, the lack of a black trapezoidal pronotal spot and the large size will separate this species from R. cruciata.
Range
AZ to LA / Mex. - Map (1)(2)
Remarks
There seems to be geographic variation in the color pattern and size of this species. Western populations (western Texas and Arizona) usually possess black markings on the central part of the head and pronotum and are slightly larger. Eastern populations (central and south Texas to Alabama) tend to have the dorsum of the head and pronotum mostly red or yellow and are often smaller than western individuals.
I had entertained the notion that the western population might represent an undescribed species closely related to R. cinctiventris on the basis of the aforementioned differences. I compared several individuals from each of these populations and could find no reliable morphological difference in a long list of examined structures, including the male pygophore. Thus, the differences were attributed to geographic variation. ~drswanny, August 2012.
Works Cited
1.Catalog of the Heteroptera, or True Bugs of Canada and the Continental United States
Thomas J. Henry, Richard C. Froeschner. 1988. Brill Academic Publishers.
2.Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF)