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Photo#410262
Probable American Snout Butterfly - Libytheana carinenta

Probable American Snout Butterfly - Libytheana carinenta
Danville/ suburban, Hendricks County, Indiana, USA
June 13, 2010
Size: 1.5 inches long
I saw this butterfly today for the first time at noon, taking nectar from goosenecked loosestrife.

Images of this individual: tag all
Probable American Snout Butterfly - Libytheana carinenta Probable American Snout Butterfly - Libytheana carinenta Probable American Snout Butterfly - Libytheana carinenta - male

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

Please see the link to a range map at Butterflies and Moths of North America under the INFO tab.

Looks too fresh to be a migrant,
but it's hard to tell for sure. Odds are that an earlier one (perhaps in April) laid eggs on some Hackberry near you, and this is the result. This one is really pretty, they are so often faded and beat up when seen.

For such a seemingly week flier, this species seems to be able to put on an incredible number of miles.

As for overwintering, if you had a mild winter, maybe so. I don't even know what stage they overwinter in, nor how far north they can do so.

 
David, We had snow on the
David,

We had snow on the ground for nearly a month, so I don't think winter would have been considered mild this year. We do have hackberry around, and we have had a real warm spell these last few days which may have hastened butterfly development.

interesting information can be found
interesting information can be found at Texas Ento
(http://texasento.net/snout.htm) about the incredible fall migrations of these butterflies. Often so thick here in south Texas they clog radiators of cars.

 
American Snout
Maury,

Thanks for the link. I wonder if the butterfly I saw migrated from down south, or if he developed here? Wonder if snouts can take cold temperatures at various stages of development (since it seems they are most common in southern regions)? I'll see if I can find these things out.

Jackie

American Snout Butterfly
I believe this individual is a male as it has four, instead of six, walking legs.

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