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Photo#41552
Rio Grande water beetle - Copelatus chevrolati

Rio Grande water beetle - Copelatus chevrolati
Las Cruces, Doña Ana County, New Mexico, USA
December 29, 2005
Size: about 6 mm
This is the same presumed species as this one, found hiding with several other water beetles of two apparent species under an object (stone I think) near a small puddle on the bed of the Rio Grande 10 or more miles north of the Mexican border.

I must say, these beetles have a whole lot more character lolling in their natural element, water, than when you haul them out on dry land.

Images of this individual: tag all
Rio Grande water beetle - Copelatus chevrolati Rio Grande water beetle - Copelatus chevrolati Rio Grande water beetle - Copelatus chevrolati

Moved

C. chevrolati
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Ah,
so they *were* the same species like I thought, maybe even the same individual. Thanks again, Tim.

duplicate comment
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Something from subfamily Colymbetinae
notched eyes at the antennal bases give it away...I don't have Larson's book at the moment but will key this out when I have the chance. This may be something interesting...

 
I see the notch.
Thanks, Tim.

Dytiscidae.
Both creatures are dytiscids (predaceous diving beetles). Not being an authority on the group, I can't say much beyond that and 'o-o-o-h! ah-h-h-h!,' as I do over most of Jim's pictures:-)

 
Thank you Eric.
I could believe you if you said *some* of my pix. I know that most of mine are lacking the vibrant color afforded by natural lighting and a *real* camera lens, and the small fry are somewhat beyond my abilities, though I post them anyway.

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