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Photo#417442
Unknown Crab Spider from California - Misumena vatia - male

Unknown Crab Spider from California - Misumena vatia - Male
Huckleberry Botanic Preserve, Alameda County, California, USA
June 26, 2010
Found this crab spider running around some web lines criss-crossing a huckleberry bush. I'm guessing it's Misumenoides formosipes or Misumena vatia, but it seems like it has the eye ridge of M. formosipes but not the white line at the anterior edge of the carapace. Anyone want to take a stab at it?

Images of this individual: tag all
Unknown Crab Spider from California - Misumena vatia - male Unknown Crab Spider from California - Misumena vatia - male Unknown Crab Spider from California - Misumena vatia - male Unknown Crab Spider from California - Misumena vatia - male

Wonderful!
That is a gorgeous spider! I've never seen one that looked purple when viewed at the right angle. Neat!

There is only one Misumena on his California list.
M importunus was moved to Misumenops and is now in the new Mecaphesa. There is likely only one Misumena in the US. The only reference we can find for Misumena fidelis, other than Banks who found it in Mexico, lists Arizona, but we find no confirmation of that. And Rod Crawford says he doesn't know if anyone other than Banks has ever seen it! If true, all of our Misumena images belong in vatia. This image is typical mature male M. vatia.

 
..
Glad someone can keep these straight. There's also -- or there was -- Misumenops (e.g. M. celer), but I'm embarrassed to say that I'd have to check the literature (or spend some time looking at them) to recall the specific differences (other than knowing the general appearance of M. celer). :-(

 
thanks!
Thanks for all the detail!

 
Considering the leg length...
...this should be called an Alaskan King Crab Spider!

 
They do look long, but they are just the right size
for an armful of girlfriend -

 
I get it!
Males throughout arthropoda tend to have the big eyes and long arms!

...would you agree that my recent submission is a female? See...


Moved
Moved from Crab Spiders.

Misumena sp.?
Looks like a Misumena male to me (although the carapace looks different from images of M. vatia that I've seen); there are 4 species in North America (Dondale & Redner, 1978). You might tak a quick peek at Steve Lew's list for CA.

Nice images.

-K

 
thanks
Looks like someone else ID'd it as M. vatia.

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