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Photo#41860
What is this/these

What is this/these
Vero Beach, Indian River County, Florida, USA
January 30, 2006
Size: 3cm
What is this/these? There appear to be eggs and a caterpillar, or something to that effect. Perhaps a sawfly.

Images of this individual: tag all
What is this/these What is this/these What is this/these What is this/these What is this/these What is this/these Theory Theory

Moved

Moved
Moved from Braconid Wasps.

Was the caterpillar...
...ever identified? And what was the host plant?

 
...
The caterpillar was not ID'ed. The plant it was on is Bidens alba

Braconid wasp cocoons.
Very nice images of a now-deceased caterpillar, and the cocoons of its braconid wasp parasites clustered around it.

 
...
The caterpillar was very much alive. I will post some more pictures that might be clearer.
If they turn out to be cocoons, I can grab them and stick them in a cage to see what emerges.

 
So
the caterpillar just happened to be near the cocoons, or do you think the wasp larvae emerged without killing the caterpillar?

 
I would say that the wasp la
I would say that the wasp larvae emerged from the caterpillar, as they were directly adjacent to the caterpillar, and the caterpillar was motionless. It wasn't until I poked the caterpillar fairly aggressively that it moved off (first it tried to bite!). Anyway, I wish I had collected it, but when I went to retrieve the cocoons, it was gone.
-Sean McCann
You can see some more of my photos at triatoma.blogspot.com

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