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Photo#42164
Tooth-necked Fungus Beetle - Laricobius rubidus

Tooth-necked Fungus Beetle - Laricobius rubidus
Hudson, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, USA
February 3, 2006
Size: 2.5 - 2.6 mm
Re the larger beetle in this image:

I collected various fungus types in a large plastic bag and was insecting this at home when I noticed this small beetle in the plastic foam deli tray I was working over. I had just been handling some gilled mushrooms growing out of a dead tree under and through the bark, so I suspect that's where it was hiding.

However, without finding another of this species on this fungus type, I cannot reasonably say there is a life-cycle association here. It could have simply been overwintering under the bark and crawled into or fallen onto the mushooms. It could also have originally been on some other fungus and crawled or fallen onto the tree mushooms inside the bag.

(I did collect quite a few of these mushrooms, and aside from a springtail and a tiny rove beetle, I saw nothing else in them.)

The beetle reminds me of both Cleri*dae because of the nice colors and bristling hairs, and Latridi*dae due to the size and the shape and heavy punctuation of the dorsum. Truthfully, I don't have a clue.

I've shot scores of photos of this beetle and these are the best shots I've gotten. I guess I needed to shoot scores more. However, the beetle has escaped!

Oh yes, the smaller beetle is a new (for bugguide and me) species of Min*ute Tree Fun*gus Beetle with "horns" on its snout, which I'll post separate images of. And why do I put asterisks in beetle names? It's to keep the %&$@* site program from showing *this* image to you when you do a search for those non-related names.

Images of this individual: tag all
Tooth-necked Fungus Beetle - Laricobius rubidus Tooth-necked Fungus Beetle - Laricobius rubidus Tooth-necked Fungus Beetle - Laricobius rubidus