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Photo#422789
Orange-winged grasshopper - Pardalophora phoenicoptera - female

Orange-winged grasshopper - Pardalophora phoenicoptera - Female
Franklin Parker Preserve, Woodland Township, Burlington County, New Jersey, USA
July 3, 2010
Size: Maybe around 45 mm?
I assume that the male found in the same area would make this a female Pardalophora phoenicoptera (Orange-winged grasshopper)?

Images of this individual: tag all
Orange-winged grasshopper - Pardalophora phoenicoptera - female Orange-winged grasshopper - Pardalophora phoenicoptera - female Orange-winged grasshopper - Pardalophora phoenicoptera - female Orange-winged grasshopper - Pardalophora phoenicoptera - female Orange-winged grasshopper - Pardalophora phoenicoptera - female Orange-winged grasshopper - Pardalophora phoenicoptera - female Orange-winged grasshopper - Pardalophora phoenicoptera - female Orange-winged grasshopper - Pardalophora phoenicoptera - female

Moved
Moved from Grasshoppers.

absolutely correct.
She is a very plain-colored one, but that helps to show the range of individual variation well.

 
Thanks
At the time I was sure they were two different species (they looked so different), I didn't even consider gender. The male would allow me to approach it a little and get a picture, but was too fast to catch. The female wouldn't allow me to shoot a picture, but was very slow in flight and easy to catch. I just walked up and put my hand in front of it, when it took off it bounced off my hand and fell to the ground, where it took a while to right itself giving me time to pick it up.

 
I was in Oklahoma a few weeks ago
looking (among others) for this very species. I stopped on top of a hill called "Suart Mountain" near the town of Stuart, and the first one I found was a female looking quite like yours. It flew up from a bare tilled powerline right of way, and went about 50 yards (she was with a male). There were no more there, just Spharagemon and Dissosteira. After that I had to figure out the proper habitat (it turned out to be small grassy openings among the Oaks, as apposed to the wide open fields). I saw literally over 100 males, but only four more females. The females just wouldn't move; they sit in the grass and hide instead of flying - and it works! If you're patient, the males will find the females for you (you just have to watch them). At other locations the females flew up just like the males, but lower and straighter, and were just as hard to catch. I suppose the behavior might depend on temperature, habitat, age, and perhaps even adaptations in the population to the local environment.

It's not unusual for males and females to look so different that some were actually named as different species at first. With this one, it helps when the coloring is the same, but often it's not.

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