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TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Photo#429691
clearwing moth? - Paranthrene tabaniformis

clearwing moth? - Paranthrene tabaniformis
Arvada, Jefferson County, Colorado, USA
July 20, 2010
Size: abt 18 mm

Images of this individual: tag all
clearwing moth? - Paranthrene tabaniformis clearwing moth? - Paranthrene tabaniformis

Moved
Moved from Sesioidea.

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

Bumble Bee Moth
We found the same thing in our back yard a couple of years ago. I caught one and sent it to the Virginia Cooperative Extension at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, VA. They confirmed it as a Bumble Bee Moth. There are four species and all are considered Clearwing Moths.

http://www.enature.com/fieldguides/detail.asp?recnum=BU0176


Virginia Cooperative Extension

http://www.ext.vt.edu/contact.html

 
Problem with nomenclature
Sorry for the late posting; however, I should point out that the creature at http://www.enature.com/fieldguides/detail.asp?recnum=BU0176 (the Snowberry Clearwing) is an entirely different type of moth than the one pictured. Furthermore, it's not closely related--being in the Sphingidae instead of the Sesiidae.

The problem is that they're both called "Clearwing" moths. In the case of the Snowberry Clearwing, the term "Clearwing" applies to a few species in the genus (Hemaris) in which it occurs; whereas in the case of the pictured individual, the term "Clearwing" applies to the family (Sesiidae) in which it occurs.

 
Moth ID
This is most likely the western form of Paranthrene tabaniformis called "oslari". The larvae feeds on poplars and willows. Bumble bee moths are generally considered day flying hawk moths(for example -see Hemaris thysbe) not Sesiids.

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