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Species Cydia piperana - Ponderosa Pine Seedworm Moth - Hodges#3489

moth - Cydia piperana Ponderosa Pine Seedworm - Cydia piperana For Oregon, For June - Cydia piperana Coppery metallic moth at lights - Cydia piperana Cydia piperana? - Cydia piperana Black and gold Tortricidae - Cydia piperana Black and gold Tortricidae - Cydia piperana Ponderosa Pine Seedworm Moth - Cydia piperana
Show images of: caterpillars · adults · both
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Lepidoptera (Butterflies and Moths)
Superfamily Tortricoidea (Tortricid Moths)
Family Tortricidae (Tortricid Moths)
Subfamily Olethreutinae
Tribe Grapholitini
Genus Cydia
Species piperana (Ponderosa Pine Seedworm Moth - Hodges#3489)
Hodges Number
3489
Synonyms and other taxonomic changes
Cydia piperana Kearfott, 1907 (1)
Phylogenetic sequence #621375
Explanation of Names
Specific epithet in honor of Charles Vancouver Piper (1867-1926), botanist and agriculturist, who collected the first specimens. (1) The orchid genus Piperia is also named for him.
Size
Forewing length 8.0-10.5 mm, males larger than females. (2)
Mature larvae 10-15 mm.
Identification
Adult - dark brownish gray, finely speckled by whitish scale tips, and with three raised, transverse bars of metallic lead- or bronze-colored scaling. Hindwing is entirely smokey brown (2)
Range
Western United States (3)
Season
Adults fly from February to June, varying with elevation and latitude. (2)
Food
As the common name suggests, Pinus ponderosa seeds provide food for the larvae.
Life Cycle
Eggs are deposited on the surface of green cones, and the larvae burrow in the main axis of the cone and into the seeds. Pupation occurs in fall and winter. Cones collected as Thanksgiving and Christmas decorations sometimes produce moths in homes! (2)
Remarks
Can inflict serious damage on seed crops of Ponderosa pines, however, no damage is visible externally.
Print References
Kearfott, W.D. 1907. New North American Tortricidae. Transactions of the American Entomological Society 33(1): 55. (1)
Works Cited
1.New North American Tortricidae.
William Dunham Kearfott. 1907. Transactions of the American Entomological Society 33(1): 1-97.
2.Moths of Western North America
Powell and Opler. 2009. UC Press.
3.North American Moth Photographers Group