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Photo#43898
Common, but ID? - Periplaneta fuliginosa

Common, but ID? - Periplaneta fuliginosa
Cary, Wake County, North Carolina, USA
March 1, 2006
Size: ~4-5mm

Images of this individual: tag all
Common, but ID? - Periplaneta fuliginosa Common, but ID? - Periplaneta fuliginosa

Moved
Moved from Periplaneta.

A real challenge
I can see why there is no response yet: hours of searching have still not yielded an ID for this species. I'm assuming it's a nymph.

I thought it could possibly be a brown-banded nymph, however the bands are lower and the top one is broader here, and it's black. I also see them in my urban apartment in the Netherlands, and they are not well-established over here (though there was an isolated case in Germany).

They have grown in size from about 4 mm to about 6-7 mm in the last few days.

Could anyone be so kind as to point me in the direction of an ID, or even simply specific tips for controlling this type of cockroach?

Thanks!

 
I found this
http://insects.tamu.edu/extension/publications/epubs/e_359.cfm scroll down to the bottom. They call it a smokeybrown cockroach nymph. We just moved to North Carolina recently and have been finding these on and off. I think they come in when it rains.

Wendy

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