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Tribe Tortricini


The Canadian Species of the Tortricid Genus Peronea
By James H. McDunnough
Can. Jour. Res. 11: 290–332, 1934

World Fauna of the Tortricini (Lepidoptera, Tortricidae)
By Jozef Razowski
Polskiej Academii Nauk. 1-575, 832 figures, 41 plates, 1966

Some North American moths of the genus Acleris (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae)
By Obraztsov, N.S.
Proceedings of the United States National Museum, 114: 213-270., 1964
Obraztsov, N.S., 1964. Some North American moths of the genus Acleris (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae). Proceedings of the United States National Museum, 114: 213-270.

Acleris effractana (Hübner, 1799) – a Holarctic tortricid
By Ole Karsholt, Leif Aarvik, David Agassiz, Peter Huemer, Kevin Tuck
Nota Lepidopterologica, 28(2): 93–102, 2005

Some North American moths of the genus Acleris (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae)
By Nicholas S. Obratzsov
Proceedings of The United States National Museum, 114(3469): 213-270, 1963

The fauna and flora of El Segundo Sand Dunes. Two new Phaloniid moths
By John A. Comstock
Bulletin of the Southern California Academy of Sciences, 38(2): 115-119, 1939

The Moths of North America north of Mexico Fascicle 8.1 Sparganothini and Atteriini
By Jerry A. Powell & John W. Brown
The Wedge Entomological Research Foundation, 2012
PDF order form from The Wedge Foundation

Immigrant Tortricidae: Holarctic versus Introduced Species in North America
By Gilligan, T.M., J.W. Brown, J, Baixeras
Insects, 11(9), 594: 1-59., 2020
Gilligan, T.M., J.W. Brown, J, Baixeras, 2020. Immigrant Tortricidae: Holarctic versus Introduced Species in North America. Insects, 11(9), 594: 1-59. https://doi.org/10.3390/insects11090594

Abstract: In support of a comprehensive update to the checklist of the moths of North America, we attempt to determine the status of 151 species of Tortricidae present in North America that may be Holarctic, introduced, or sibling species of their European counterparts. Discovering the natural distributions of these taxa is often difficult, if not impossible, but several criteria can be applied to determine if a species that is present in both Europe and North America is natively Holarctic, introduced, or represented by different but closely related species on each continent.