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Photo#442697
Tachypompilus unicolor Wasp - Tachypompilus unicolor - female

Tachypompilus unicolor Wasp - Tachypompilus unicolor - Female
Sunnyvale, Santa Clara County, California, USA
July 8, 2009
Size: 1.25"
Any ID help is appreciated.

Images of this individual: tag all
Tachypompilus unicolor Wasp - Tachypompilus unicolor - female Tachypompilus unicolor wasp - Tachypompilus unicolor - female

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

how do you know it's a male?
-

 
Wasp
Hello Jody,
I don't exactly. It did not have an obvious ovipositor, so I made the assumption it was male. I am basing that assumption on previous wasps that I have requested to be identified here. Please correct me if I am wrong. I apologize if it was in error and will endevor to not make these kinds of assumptions in the future.
Regards,
Dan

 
It's not...
it's actually a female.

 
Tachypompilus unicolor - Female
Duly noted and corrected.

Tachypompilus unicolor
...

Antennae look wrong for an Ichneumon.
I'm guessing this might be a Pompilid--maybe Tachypompilus?



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