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Photo#4460
Ummidia - male

Ummidia - Male
Parkwood, Durham, Durham County, North Carolina, USA
June 23, 2003
Size: 13 mm
Found wandering around on a road. This is a male--large pedipalps. Chilled, posed, and released. Body length about 17 mm (original photo was with a scale, edited out in this version). Looks identical to the specimen from Salisbury, NC, almost the same date in 2004.

Stephen Hall, of the North Carolina Natural Heritage Program, informs me that this is one of two species U. audouini, or U. carabivora. (Note that he was referring to the taxonomy of 2003, before some additional species were described from the Southeast in 2021.)

Updates 11/19/23. Looking carefully at image next to a scale, the body length (front of cephalothorax to tip of abdomen) is about 13 mm, not 17mm as I initially estimated. Also added additional detail images.
Comparing description and images in Godwin and Brown (2021), this looks to be consistent with Ummidia audouini, but I'm not quite sure.
Godwin RL, Bond JE (2021) Taxonomic revision of the New World members of the trapdoor spider genus Ummidia Thorell (Araneae, Mygalomorphae, Halonoproctidae). ZooKeys 1027: 1-165. https://doi.org/10.3897/zookeys.1027.54888

Images of this individual: tag all
Ummidia - male Ummidia - male Ummidia - male Ummidia - male Ummidia - male Ummidia - male

Great shot!
Great shot!

trap door spider
Great shot. Scary looking dude, so glad they are so small :D.

looks like a purseweb spider
it looks like a male purseweb spider

Tanks of the spider world
Perhaps it's just me, but every time I see these spiders, I think "Tank" (as in military). Not so much in how they act, but how they look.

I concur
Ummidia has a strong depression or "saddle" on the "patella" segment of the fourth leg if my memory serves. Looks like this one has such a feature, judging by how the light reflects of its fourth "knee."

 
Tibia
third leg, saddle-shaped.

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