Identification, Images, & Information
For Insects, Spiders & Their Kin
For the United States & Canada
Clickable Guide
Moths Butterflies Flies Caterpillars Flies Dragonflies Flies Mantids Cockroaches Bees and Wasps Walkingsticks Earwigs Ants Termites Hoppers and Kin Hoppers and Kin Beetles True Bugs Fleas Grasshoppers and Kin Ticks Spiders Scorpions Centipedes Millipedes

Calendar
Upcoming Events

National Moth Week photos of insects and people. Here's how to add your images.

Photos of insects and people from the 2019 BugGuide Gathering in Louisiana, July 25-27

Discussion, insects and people from the 2018 gathering in Virginia, July 27-29

Photos of insects and people from the 2015 gathering in Wisconsin, July 10-12

Photos of insects and people from the 2014 gathering in Virginia, June 4-7.

Photos of insects and people from the 2013 gathering in Arizona, July 25-28

Photos of insects and people from the 2012 gathering in Alabama

Photos of insects and people from the 2011 gathering in Iowa


TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Photo#447505
Crane Fly - Limonia communis - female

Crane Fly - Limonia communis - Female
Harrisonburg, Rockingham County, Virginia, USA
August 26, 2010
Size: ~12 mm
This crane fly was feeding on garlic blossoms in a garden at dusk. Identified to Tipulomorpha via BugGuide images and comments. I think I count 14 antennae segments, which I believe places it in Limoniidae. Also, I think the lateral view shows a short ovipositor.

Images of this individual: tag all
Crane Fly - Limonia communis - female Crane Fly - Limonia communis - female Crane Fly - Limonia communis - female

Moved
Moved from Tipulomorpha.

My non-expert opinion:
The long rostrum (the beak, for lack of a better word) would make it Toxorhina or Elephantomyia I think. I'm partial to the latter because the end of the abdomen does not stick out beyond the tips of the wings, and Elephantomyia seems to have the appearance of two bumps on the thorax below the "v" suture.

I used the Carnegie pages to come to this conclusion: http://iz.carnegiemnh.org/cranefly/limoniinae.htm

An expert will see this eventually.

 
Thanks Erick
Based on that link and some comments on BugGuide, I also found Limonia (Geranomyia) communis. This fly was demonstrating a behavior as described. Each time it would land on a blossum, it would bob its head up and down very rapidly a number of times.

 
I believe you're right.
I browse that site fairly often, but I haven't read it all thoroughly.
I'm glad I commented on your photo, because you made me aware of this Limonia I'd otherwise overlooked. How great is that? Thanks.

 
This one is
a female of Limonia communis . - Chen

Comment viewing options
Select your preferred way to display the comments and click 'Save settings' to activate your changes.