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Photo#449690
Dogbane Saucrobotys Moth - Hodges #4936 (Saucrobotys futilalis) - Saucrobotys futilalis

Dogbane Saucrobotys Moth - Hodges #4936 (Saucrobotys futilalis) - Saucrobotys futilalis
East Brunswick, Middlesex County, New Jersey, USA
August 29, 2010
For some reason, a particularly difficult moth to ID. The markings are not very distinct.
The differences in appearance between the 2 images here is due to different light sources.

The first image was illuminated by CF light and camera flash.

Attracted to different outside light sources.

Images of this individual: tag all
Dogbane Saucrobotys Moth - Hodges #4936 (Saucrobotys futilalis) - Saucrobotys futilalis Dogbane Saucrobotys Moth - Hodges #4936 (Saucrobotys futilalis) - Saucrobotys futilalis

Images
These are both the same moth?

 
Same Moth
Yes. This moth was very active in the front of my house, landing on the siding, trim or the green and gold number plaque by the front door. It's not always easy adjusting color to match daylight, or to make very different color balances come out the same.

The flash on the small pocketable camera I use for macros here would completely wash out the extreme close-up images if it weren't attenuated by several layers of paper taped in front of the flash. That is close to daylight. However, incandescent lights have a very orangey caste, while compact fluorescent lights have a complex spectrum that is bright in two different ranges of the light spectrum. These are most difficult to adjust for a good balance. So, the same moth in 2 different lighting conditions.

The first shot was illuminated by the incandescent light only. This is a simple camera and won't 'fill-in', so the flash didn't fire at all. The second shot was illuminated by the filtered flash. Therefore, the angle of light was quite different with these two shots. However, it does 'illuminate' (sorry) the differences with how a moth may appear with different lighting sources and with light from different angles.

 
Thanks
When you said "The moths more closely resembled one another with regard to color than shown." I thought that there were 2 moths.

 
Fixed
Yes, that was not clear and I eliminated the line. Thanks.

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