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Photo#45168
Head & pronutum (and mites!) - Lycus sanguineus

Head & pronutum (and mites!) - Lycus sanguineus
Organ Mts. foothills, Dona Ana County, New Mexico, USA
December 26, 2005
Size: about 17 mm
Photo taken mar. 17, 2006. I wanted to show the distinctive head shape of this genus. Some enterprising mites have boarded the bus.

Images of this individual: tag all
Lycid larvae? - Lycus sanguineus Lycid larvae? - Lycus sanguineus Lycid larvae? - Lycus sanguineus Lycid larvae? - Lycus sanguineus Lycid pupa - Lycus sanguineus Lycid pupa - Lycus sanguineus Lycid pupa, getting colorful! - Lycus sanguineus Lycid pupa, getting colorful! - Lycus sanguineus Lycid pupa, getting colorful! - Lycus sanguineus Lycid emerges - Lycus sanguineus Lycid emerges - Lycus sanguineus Lycid emerges - Lycus sanguineus All grown up! - Lycus sanguineus Head & pronutum (and mites!) - Lycus sanguineus Head & pronutum (and mites!) - Lycus sanguineus

This image has been requested
for a London Natural History Museum book on arachnids.

Moved
Moved from Lycus.

Great series!
And great close up! I learned a lot just looking at these images. It is also very interesting that local mites found it and got a ride even though it was not a familiar species.

 
I love this series, too.
I'm wondering if you kept them in this ?petri dish the whole time, and did you do anything to control heat/humidity or make conditions more favorable for their development in any way?

 
Thanks Hannah and Beatriz
I kept the larvae in a parts tray cubicle on my bathroom vanity top along with a few smaller larvae, some adult Laemophloeids, some rotted wood/frass, a few scraps of fungus (including a leaf covered with slime mold spores), a couple dried shrimp pellets, some rolled oats, and a couple of small earthworms. I tried to maintain some moisture, but not too much as this is obviously a desert species. After all three appeared to have died, I placed them in a small plastic parts tray cubicle just to be sure they were dead. Only one was. This one pupated and the last one molted. The temperature ranged between 65 and 70 degrees with occasional brief periods of 85 or 90 degrees when I turned on my bathroom heater before a shower.

After this one pupated, I kept a small wad of moist tissue in its cubicle and threw another local tenebrionid pupa in with it that should emerge very soon.

Good morning :)
Where did the mites come from?

 
New Hampshire
in all likelihod.

Hey, Tom Murray and I are getting together (first time) to explore a wooded area this morning. Want to come along?

 
this morning?
You know I do, but I don't see how that's likely. Stop teasing!

 
Yes, I was teasing.
I *knew* you would. Well, maybe someday. Bugguide field trips!!

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