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Photo#454590
Cockroach - Parcoblatta virginica

Cockroach - Parcoblatta virginica
Hopkins Gap, Little North Mountain, Rockingham County, Virginia, USA
September 11, 2010
Size: ~20 mm
This unfortunate cockroach was captured by red ants on a fallen log and hauled into their colony in the log. The ant is likely Aphaenogaster tennesseensis linked below.


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Cockroach - Parcoblatta virginica Cockroach - Parcoblatta virginica Cockroach - Parcoblatta virginica Cockroach - Parcoblatta virginica

Moved
Moved from Wood Cockroaches.

Moved

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

 
These brown cockroach nymphs
These brown cockroach nymphs are really hard for me to ID. I would guess Parcoblatta but it would be difficult to be certain.

The clipping off of the antennae reminded me of the Cockroach Wasps, which inject mind-numbing venom into the cockroach's brain, clip off the antennae, and then lead the helpless creature to an underground lair by the stumps left from the clipping. The cockroach is eventually eaten alive by the wasp's offspring. I think I would rather be hacked apart by ants than face that fate. We have some nice pictures of those Cockroach Wasps:

 
Thanks John
I figured it might be hard to identify, was hoping the ants flipping it over might be helpful though. Speaking of cockroach wasps, I saw this one on the same log a few minutes after the ants hauled off the nymph. It even ran around the ant colony entrance in the log for a bit.

 
"Saved" by ants
I thought it strange for a roach nymph to be out and about during the day where ants could find it so easily, and then not to scurry away quickly when attacked. The roach had probably been stung by the Cockroach Wasp already, and was taken away by the ants. Your pictures tell a very interesting story.

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