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Photo#45581
fly - Archytas apicifer - female

fly - Archytas apicifer - Female
San Leandro, Alameda County, California, USA
March 14, 2006
Size: 13mm
Last one -- a head shot with antennae from above.

Images of this individual: tag all
pupa - Archytas apicifer pupal remains - Archytas apicifer fly - Archytas apicifer fly - Archytas apicifer - female fly - Archytas apicifer - female fly - Archytas apicifer fly - Archytas apicifer - female

Wow
Superb Photography, I have to figure out a great method like yours. I love these close shot. EXXXXXXXXXcellent work
Kudos
Kathleen

Moved
Moved from Archytas.

Marvellous!
A picture book series.

I'll second that!
How did you get the subject to pose for you? Chilled maybe? And the lighting looks softer than I would expect from an MT-24EX. Is that what you used?

Jay Barnes

 
yes
I put the fly in the fridge for a few minutes before taking the photos. However, it was still a surprisingly calm fly -- maybe they are like that after first emerging from pupas? I don't know; I've never had a newly-emerged fly before.

I did use the MT-24EX flash -- without diffusers or anything. Maybe the lighting looks soft because this fly had fewer reflective surfaces to show harsh light spots compared to some subjects (like ladybeetles).

Fantastic images
Fantastic images!

--Stephen

Stephen Cresswell
Buckhannon, WV
www.stephencresswell.com

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