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Species Draeculacephala bradleyi

Sharpshooter? - Draeculacephala bradleyi - female Sharpshooter - Draeculacephala bradleyi - female Sharpshooter - Draeculacephala bradleyi - male Draeculacephala bradleyi - female Draeculacephala bradleyi - female ? - Draeculacephala bradleyi - female Draeculacephala bradleyi - male Draeculacephala bradleyi
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Hemiptera (True Bugs, Cicadas, Hoppers, Aphids and Allies)
Suborder Auchenorrhyncha (Free-living Hemipterans)
Infraorder Cicadomorpha
Superfamily Membracoidea (Leafhoppers, Treehoppers and Aetalionids)
Family Cicadellidae (Leafhoppers)
Subfamily Cicadellinae (Sharpshooters)
Tribe Cicadellini
Genus Draeculacephala
Species bradleyi (Draeculacephala bradleyi)
Explanation of Names
Draeculacephala bradleyi (Van Duzee, 1915)
Size
♂♂ < 6.6.mm, ♀♀ < 8.0mm
Identification
A green white-veined species with an underside much darker than any other Draeculacephala in the Eastern U.S. Some males can have paler faces, so clear views from different angles are important. The anterior pronotum of bradleyi is often vermiformly marked in a similar (but less pronounced) manner to D. inscripta. This alone is not diagnostic—some forms of other species carry the markings on the pronotum as well, but these markings are much more pronounced on bradleyi. Both sexes have a brown thorax and abdomen. Males have somewhat blunt heads (compared to other members of the genus) that are around the same length of the pronotum or slightly shorter, while females have very elongated and pointy heads.

note dark, black face of females:
Range
Southeastern US & Cuba (Isle of Pines).(1) An uncommon to rare species in most locations.
See Also
Draeculacephala antica — a much more common species which can sometimes look quite similar. However; the head is downcurved, males have pointier heads, there is a distinctly dark line on the edge of the head, and females have a paler face (it can be a dark brown in some individuals, but not black).


Draeculacephala paludosa — this rare species can sometimes look similar when viewed from above. It has an inflated face, its range is not known to overlap, and is known from the great lakes region and the mid-atlantic, closely related to the coastal D. portola


Draeculacephala robinsoni — although much larger in size, females of this species can sometimes have rather dark faces, being the source of occasional confusion. this species is much more common and widespread and has blue venation as opposed to the white of bradleyi