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Species Symmoca signatella - Hodges#1133

Moth ID 4 - Symmoca signatella Moth - Symmoca signatella Small moth - Symmoca signatella Gray moth - Symmoca signatella 1133  - Symmoca signatella Which moth is this? - Symmoca signatella Symmoca signatella Tortricidae species?  - Symmoca signatella
Show images of: caterpillars · adults · both
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Lepidoptera (Butterflies and Moths)
Superfamily Gelechioidea (Twirler Moths and kin)
Family Autostichidae
Subfamily Symmocinae
Genus Symmoca
Species signatella (Symmoca signatella - Hodges#1133)
Hodges Number
1133
Synonyms and other taxonomic changes
Symmoca signatella Herrich-Schäffer, 1854
syn. Symmoca rosmarinella Walsingham, 1901
Numbers
The only species in the genus found north of Mexico. (1), (2)
Size
Forewing length 6-8 mm. (3)
Identification
Range
Introduced from Europe.
Lee & Brown (2006) reports the range as California to Oregon, and Illinois, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York. (2)
Season
Powell & Opler (2009) reports adult records from June to September in California. (3)
Adults are most common from March to September based on Moth Photographers Group records.
Food
Larvae feed on dead plant matter.
Powell & Opler (2009) reports the species is likely a lichen feeder in Europe. (3)
Remarks
First found in Pasadena and Orange County, California around 1942-1943 and spread to San Francisco by the 1960's. (3)
Introduced to London, England around 1889.
Print References
Griffith, A.F. 1892. The Entomologist's Monthly Magazine. London. 27: 8.
Herrich-Schäffer, [1855,] 1854. Systematische Bearbeitung der Schmetterlinge Europa, 5: 111.
Lee, S. & R.L. Brown. 2006. A review of Symmocinae (Lepidoptera: Autostichidae) in North America with the description of a new species and new genus. Journal of the Lepidopterists’ Society 64(4): 183, figs. 3, 7, 13. (2)
Powell, J.A. & P.A. Opler 2009. Moths of Western North America. pl. 4.9; p. 60. (3)
Stainton, H.T. 1869. The Tineina of Southern Europe. 241.
Works Cited
1.Check list of the Lepidoptera of America north of Mexico.
Hodges, et al. (editors). 1983. E. W. Classey, London. 284 pp.
2.A review of Symmocinae (Lepidoptera: Autostichidae) in North America with the description of a new species and new genus
Sangmi Lee, Richard L. Brown. 2010. Journal of the Lepidopterists’ Society 64(4): 177–187.
3.Moths of Western North America
Powell and Opler. 2009. UC Press.