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Photo#45949
Tiny  roving larva with antennae

Tiny roving larva with antennae
Nashua, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, USA
February 16, 2006
Size: 2.3 - 2.5 mm
While inspecting the frass-and-rotten-wood-packed rearing container in which I have dozens of Osmo*derma larvae, I noticed this white something-or-other that looked bigger than a mite or a springtail. Under magnification, I think it is a beetle larva. But what kind? Those antennae, or whatever grubs have for feelers/sensors in that location, are pretty phenomenal. It's got well developed legs and seems very alert.

I've put this little guy in his own jar. I think I'll put some springtails in there too since he looks like a hunter to me.

Presumably this creature came in the materials I collected at the windfall maple site that the Osmo*derma grubs came from. There was some kind of mammal nest atop the frass-packed Osmo*derma chamber.

Images of this individual: tag all
Tiny  roving larva with antennae Tiny  roving larva with antennae

Staphylinidae
It is one of the staphylinids.

 
Aha!
And that's why it was "roving" around like that. Most of the rove larvae I find are the big-headed ones like in Tom's image that John & Jane thumbnailed below.

Interesting
how much this pose looks like Tom's recent Rove image! They both have the same posture

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