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Photo#46474
Ant-like stone beetle? - Stenichnus scutellaris

Ant-like stone beetle? - Stenichnus scutellaris
Bolton, Worcester County, Massachusetts, USA
April 1, 2006
Size: 1.5mm

Images of this individual: tag all
Ant-like stone beetle? - Stenichnus scutellaris Ant-like stone beetle? - Stenichnus scutellaris

Moved
Moved from Stenichnus.

I wonder if . . .
this might be a male of Stenichnus (Cyrtoscydmus) scutellaris. The triangular expansion of the anterior femora is characteristic for that species in frame of our fauna (normal shape in females), and it also fits in size, shape, and colour.
Since this is one of the most common litter species in Europe, it is quite likely having been introduced - but I haven`t been able to find a record on the web to support my guess.

 
There are 5 spp. on New Hampshire checklist,
including one former Cyrtoscydmus sp. See here for Stenichnus.

Scydmaenidae: Stenichnus sp.
A Stenichnus in the old sense, maybe Parascydmus today (the subgenera are now recongized as genera).

 
location
Both this genus and the Euconnus species I found earlier, were under the same rock.

Looks hairy to me, Tom.
The hairs are sparse and rather prone on the elytra. Probably a less-hairy species.

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