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Photo#468709
Io moth, facial closeup - Automeris io - male

Io moth, facial closeup - Automeris io - Male
Sarasota, Sarasota County, Florida, USA
October 22, 2010
When my daughter asked what do they eat, I was surprised to learn that adult Io moths simply don't. They survive as adults for less than a week, on fat stores built up while caterpillars. The lack of a digestive tract and only vestigial mouth parts explain the interesting appearance of the moth face in this closeup. The males have beautiful broad antennae, for sensing the female pheromones in stereo. The small fine strands of something - possibly tennis ball fuzz from the container we temporarily had the moth in. The moth was poised on my flash cord extender and flew off a second later.

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Io moth, facial closeup - Automeris io - male Io moth - Automeris io - male