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Species Sphinx perelegans - Elegant Sphinx - Hodges#7805

Species Sphinx perelegans - Elegant Sphinx - Hodges#7805 - Sphinx perelegans Elegant Sphinx - Sphinx perelegans Moth - Sphinx perelegans Sphinx perelegans Large black and white moth - Sphinx perelegans Elegant Sphinx Moth (Sphinx perelegans) - Sphinx perelegans Elegant Sphinx Moth - Sphinx perelegans Elegant Sphinx Moth - Sphinx perelegans
Show images of: caterpillars · adults · both
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Lepidoptera (Butterflies and Moths)
Superfamily Bombycoidea (Silkworm, Sphinx, and Royal Moths)
Family Sphingidae (Sphinx Moths)
Subfamily Sphinginae
Tribe Sphingini
Genus Sphinx
Species perelegans (Elegant Sphinx - Hodges#7805)
Hodges Number
7805
Synonyms and other taxonomic changes
First described in 1874 by Henry Edwards as Sphinx perelegans
Identification
The larva has a shield on the first thoracic segment, which is of the same color as the body and which forms a tight-fitting hood over the vertex of the head. This hides a pair of glossy black spots on top of the head, which are revealed if the animal is disturbed. The eye-like appearance of these is enhanced by pale purple intersegmental cuticle behind the head. The full-grown larvae also bite. Comment by Bill Oehlke.