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Photo#469679
Blue-ringed Dancer - Argia sedula - female

Blue-ringed Dancer - Argia sedula - Female
Kokomo, Howard County, Indiana, USA
August 12, 2005
I thought this was a dancer, but I can't seem to find anything in the guide that matches. Any suggestions would be appreciated. Thanks!

Moved
Moved from Damselflies.

Damselfly
This is a female Argia sedula (Blue-ringed Dancer). Females of this species are pretty much the dullest of all the Argia species, and the ID is relatively easy in Indiana, with the limited diversity. The somewhat amber-tinged wings are also a good field mark for the female.

 
Blue-ringed Dancer (Argia sedula)
Thanks so much for your comment. Dan also suggested Blue-ringed Dancer, but I had ruled out that possibility after reading in Ed Lam's book that the female's thorax has ill-defined shoulder stripe and abdominal segments 8-10 pale. I thought that pale meant beige or tan colored, now I realize that pale means not black. I thought that ill-defined meant practically non-existent, as in many of the photos on bugguide, but just read that some females show slightly more prominent shoulder stripes. I still haven't found any photos on the web with a thorax marked like this individual, but after re-examining this species, I finally see what you and Dan are guiding me to. Sometimes I'm slow to learn, but with enough help, I eventually get there. Thanks, Dennis!

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

Argia sedula or fumipennis?
The dancers that seem to match the best are Argia sedula (Blue-ringed Dancer) and Argia fumipennis (Variable Dancer).

 
Thanks for your help
I've never seen a Blue-ringed dancer in my yard, but I've seen several Variable dancers, male and female, so it seems more likely to be a Variable dancer. The abdomen looks right, it's just those shoulder stripes that were throwing me off. I guess they don't call them Variable for nothing ;)

Female Dancer
It is a female Dancer. I don't have resources here to go farther with the ID. I will try to take a look this weekend.

 
Thanks
For confirming her as a dancer. I've looked again on bugguide and on odonata central, and still haven't found anything close to an i.d. I'm keeping my fingers crossed. Thanks for looking!

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