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TaxonomyBrowse
Info
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Genus Stagmomantis

Pale Mantid - Stagmomantis limbata - female a carolina mantid? - Stagmomantis carolina - female Very small praying mantis - Stagmomantis californica - male Pasadena Mantis... - Stagmomantis limbata - female Mantid 082615 - Stagmomantis carolina - female Stagmomantis californica Male, Bordered Mantis? - Stagmomantis californica - male Mantid Nymphs - Stagmomantis carolina
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Mantodea (Mantids)
Family Mantidae
Genus Stagmomantis
Synonyms and other taxonomic changes
reviewed in (1)
Explanation of Names
Stagmomantis Saussure 1869
'dotted Mantis'
Numbers
12 spp. in our area, 22 total(1)
Identification
The facial shield (plate below antennal insertion and between the eyes) is relatively long and narrow in Stagmomantis (1-3), more squarish in Tenodera sinensis (4 & 5)
1 2 3 4 5
Range
New World (from ~40°N to n Brazil), mostly neotropical(1)
Remarks
our only representative of the subfamily Stagmomantinae, that contains two more genera(2)
Print References
Hebard, M. 1935. Orthoptera of the Upper Rio Grande Valley and the Adjacent Mountains in Northern New Mexico. Proceedings of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia 87: 45-82. (JSTOR)
Hebard, M. 1942-1943. The Dermaptera and Orthopterous Families Blattidae, Mantidae and Phasmidae of Texas. Transactions of the American Entomological Society 68(4): 239-310. (JSTOR)
Rehn, J. A. G. 1907. Notes on Orthoptera from Southern Arizona, with descriptions of new species. Proceedings of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia 59: 24-81. (Biodiversity Library)