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Photo#483177
Female Geometrid adult specimen_023 - Nemoria intensaria - female

Female Geometrid adult specimen_023 - Nemoria intensaria - Female
Emery County, Utah, USA
Located caterpillars in Emery County, Utah feeding on Corymbosum Buckwheat september 21, 2010.Brought two home and fed on Racemosum Buckwheat. Two developed into pupa and then one pupa developed and a female adult emerged.

Images of this individual: tag all
Female Geometrid adult specimen_023 - Nemoria intensaria - female Female Geometrid adult specimen_023 - Nemoria intensaria - female Female Geometrid adult specimen_023 - Nemoria intensaria - female Female Geometrid adult specimen_023 - Nemoria intensaria - female Female Geometrid adult specimen_023 - Nemoria intensaria - female Female Geometrid adult specimen_023 - Nemoria intensaria - female

Moved to Nemoria intensaria
Moved from Nemoria festaria.

"I’d call the moth in the image intensaria because it is a dead ringer in Ferguson’s monograph for that species, which was described originally from Utah." Chris Schmidt pers comm. 09/13/2017. He also notes that this along with albilineata and caerulescens may get lumped with festaria at some point in the future.

gorgeous life cycle
Hi Nicky,

Can I link to this from my life cycles site: Buglifecycles.com? I'd love to have you as a contributor.

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

Probably 7044 - Nemoria festaria "type albilineata"
I sent the photo to John Gruber who specializes in the Geometrinae. See his website. John thinks that N. albilineata (7044.1) and N. festaria are a single species in need of further study. He will probably contact you regarding specifics of the collecting locality to enable him to acquire needed research specimens.

Please contact me at BPatter789@aol.com regarding permission to display photos of moths and larvae that you post here also on plates and species pages at Moth Photographers Group. Thanks.

Dates
The pinned images shouldn't have the image date as it implies the moth would be active as an adult on that date. It should either be the date the adult emerged or blank.

The date on the adult live image may need to also be blanked if it was raised indoors, because that may have thrown off the normal growth cycle. I'm not sure.

 
life cycle
This specimen photo and the newly emerged female photo were the result of my persuading the pupa to develop and emerge by exposing it to light 24 hours a day and by misting it daily to imitate springtime in the desert. I had two pupae and just the female developed and emerged. The other pupae is in hibernation in a refrigerator with a container of water in it to keep the pupa from getting dehydrated. I'm trying to keep the temperature at 31 degrees F. That may be about the same as it would be in the desert under dried host plant leaves and a covering of snow to insulate it. If these must feed on the fall blooming eriogonums, the adults would emerge in time to allow the caterpillars to feed on the blooms. These may be fine eating leaves or even other plants, though. So their natural timing is unknown to me.

 
Good points...
...that I overlooked entirely. Thanks for cleaning up after me. :)

 
I raise a lot of bugs indoors (mostly spiders)
and still mess it up once in a while!

This is just an educated guess,
but I think it might be Nemoria festaria.

Incidentally...
I noticed that all of the shots in this series display the same date. You'll want to edit them so that each shows the date the photograph was taken. While you're editing, please be sure that the "adult" or "immature" box is checked as appropriate for each image. Thanks!

Judging mainly by the caterpillar...
...I'm guessing this might be something in Nemoria.

That's not an ID--just a possibility to consider while waiting for the lep experts to tell you what it really is. :)

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