Identification, Images, & Information
For Insects, Spiders & Their Kin
For the United States & Canada
Clickable Guide
Moths Butterflies Flies Caterpillars Flies Dragonflies Flies Mantids Cockroaches Bees and Wasps Walkingsticks Earwigs Ants Termites Hoppers and Kin Hoppers and Kin Beetles True Bugs Fleas Grasshoppers and Kin Ticks Spiders Scorpions Centipedes Millipedes

Calendar
Upcoming Events

Information, insects and people from the 2019 BugGuide Gathering in Louisiana, July 25-27

Discussion, insects and people from the 2018 gathering in Virginia, July 27-29

Photos of insects and people from the 2015 gathering in Wisconsin, July 10-12

Photos of insects and people from the 2014 gathering in Virginia, June 4-7.

Photos of insects and people from the 2013 gathering in Arizona, July 25-28

Photos of insects and people from the 2012 gathering in Alabama

Photos of insects and people from the 2011 gathering in Iowa


TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Photo#487183
Underground scale insects?

Underground scale insects?
Huntington, Chittenden County, Vermont, USA
April 19, 2008
Size: ~3 mm
Found under a log.

Images of this individual: tag all
Underground scale insects? Underground scale insects?

Moved
Moved from Ground Pearls.
Based on this, 'ground pearls' are not just in the genus Margarodes, so I'm moving these up to family level.

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

I wonder if they could be the
I wonder if they could be the empty "shells" of Ground Pearls (Margarodes sp.)?

 
That's what I was wondering...
but I couldn't find any images of them that really look like this.

 
Most pictures feature the liv
Most pictures feature the live nymphs in their "cysts" or "shells" and they seem to be more yellow. But they're described as being yellowish-purple. These are clearly empty of the insect that was inside (assuming ground pearls) and so they may age to this brownish color. Its just a guess, but I can't think of anything else off the top of my head.

 
According to
this website, "The voided, waxy, spherical covering of the insect is the most likely structure to be encountered. The sphere is pink to yellowish-brown in color and measures from 1/6 of an inch in diameter to as small as a grain of sand."

Seems pretty good to me; I'll move these to the (new) guide page, and hopefully someone will let us know if we're wrong.

Comment viewing options
Select your preferred way to display the comments and click 'Save settings' to activate your changes.