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Photo#491994
Proceratium queen - Proceratium silaceum - female

Proceratium queen - Proceratium silaceum - Female
Swannanoa, Buncombe County, North Carolina, USA
January 28, 2011
Size: 3.5mm
P. pergandei? found hibernating under bark. I hope to start a colony. They eat arthropod eggs, correct?

Images of this individual: tag all
Proceratium queen - Proceratium silaceum - female Proceratium queen - Proceratium silaceum - female

Moved
Well, most or all from that area could be found in rotting wood, and are also found in soil or forest leaf mold. However, the dark brown color and small size of this queen pegs her as P. silaceum.

 
Thanks Dr. Trager!
Thanks Dr. Trager!

 
JOdy -- Any success rearing t
JOdy -- Any success rearing this critter? My one attempt, some years ago, to rear P. californicum on spider eggs went pretty well, until I went away for a few days and died from desiccation.

 
I put a good number of spider
I put a good number of spider eggs in there, put a tissue with some water in as well, however I left her at my moms house, and when I came back from my dads she had sadly perished. While I haven't found any more silaceum queens, I have found a good number of other Proceratium queens, appearing to be in two species (I'll post pics soon). These queens seem to be doing well, no workers yet though. A really neat find today (I'm hesitant to tell you as I'm not quite positive yet) was an Amblyopone. It looked like pallipes, except the mandibles seemed longer and I couldn't see the teeth on the sides of the head. Definitely not trigonignatha though, as the mandibles were seemingly even thinner than pallipes. I'll post pics of that soon as well..

 
ignore my earlier comment abo
ignore my earlier comment about the amblyopone; I'm fairly sure it's just pallipes now, but I'll still post pics of it..

hmmmm... it seems as if P sil
hmmmm... it seems as if P silaceum might be the only one in my area that nests in fallen logs...

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