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Photo#49317
Small bees and pillows? - Perdita interrupta

Small bees and pillows? - Perdita interrupta
Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden, Claremont, CA, California, USA
April 24, 2006
Many mating pairs were sighted. Several of them used a portion of the flower as a "pillow". I almost hesitate to ask, but is this normal behavior?

(This paragraph added later. After checking several other photos more carefully, the "pillow" I alluded to earlier appears to be pollen sacs. Sorry for any confusion.)

Images of this individual: tag all
Small bees and pillows? - Perdita interrupta Small bees and pillows? - Perdita interrupta - male - female Small bees and pillows? - Perdita interrupta - male - female

Moved
Moved from Perdita.

 
Thanks so much, Chuck, for the page and move.
I had a bit of a problem figuring out the exact name.

Perdita (Pygoperdita) interrupta interrupta Cresson
A well-known oligolege of Eschscholzia californica (California Poppy).

There are 700 Perdita species but knowing the locality and host plant narrows down the possibilities

The "pollen sacs" consist of a pollen mass moistened by nectar, which "glues" it to the sparsely hairy tibia, which the mass surrounds.

Pygoperdita typically mate inside their host flowers

 
Thanks, John, I'd missed your recent comments.
For some silly reason, I wasn't subscribed to this. Will now check my new images to see if they're worth posting, being same insect/month/place.

Moved
Moved from Bees.

Perdita?
I know that some species of Perdita (and there are literally hundreds of species) are pollinators of poppies. They are generally very small, and often ornately marked. They are members of the family Andrenidae. I'll be curious to see if Richard agrees with me.

 
yes
this is a Perdita

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