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Photo#49456
Moth - Caloptilia stigmatella

Moth - Caloptilia stigmatella
Baton Rouge, Brocade Drive, East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana, USA
May 24, 1970
Size: 5.8 mm. including wings
Collected at UV light. I believe this is in the family Gracillariidae, genus Caloptilia, and is a pretty good match for C. packardella seen here, near the bottom of the plate. I would appreciate input and possible move to guide at appropriate level. Thanks, Gayle

Images of this individual: tag all
Moth - Caloptilia stigmatella Moth - Caloptilia stigmatella

Moved
Moved from Caloptilia.

Caloptilia
This is Caloptilia stigmatella, the larva of which feeds on Salix and Populus. For comparison, an image of a live individual of C. stigmatella that was reared from Populus deltoides can be seen at http://www.microleps.org/Guide/Gracillariidae/Gracillariinae/index.html

 
Thanks Terry,
We appreciate your help.
We have thoroughly enjoyed microleps.org!
Gayle

Moved
to guide page.

I'd Use Caution on This One........
...the color pattern is indeed like C. packardella. We have a second spread specimen photo of that species from Jim Vargo on This Plate. In both cases the major color is a kind of honey-tan, whereas your moth is a rich chocolate-brown. Until we know more about these species (are the sexes colored differently?) it is perhaps best to think of this as yet another Caloptilia sp.

 
Thanks Bob
I agree with Caloptilia sp. I have added a recent photo of the spread specimen of the photo subject. The color seem to be essentially unchanged. I have several other similiar specimens collected around the same time.
Gayle

 
Lovely Work with the spread specimen.
.... few people will realize just how much talent that takes. Most collectors don't even bother with these tiny moths because they ruin the specimens in attempting to make proper mounts.

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