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Photo#49575
Bup with yellow racing stripes - Agrilus bilineatus

Bup with yellow racing stripes - Agrilus bilineatus
Nashua, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, USA
April 25, 2006
Size: 9.7 mm
Still not very mobile, the eclosed beetle has its full color.

Images of this individual: tag all
Bup with yellow racing stripes - Agrilus bilineatus Bup with yellow racing stripes - Agrilus bilineatus Bup with yellow racing stripes - Agrilus bilineatus Bup with yellow racing stripes - Agrilus bilineatus Bup with yellow racing stripes - Agrilus bilineatus Bup with yellow racing stripes - Agrilus bilineatus Bup with yellow racing stripes - Agrilus bilineatus

Agrilus bilineatus
Jim, this is Agrilus bilineatus. The blueish elytra and yellowish strips could make this Agrilus bilineatus carpini. I am not sure, but A. bilineatus is a definite. Great shots.

 
carpini, now sp.
Josh, just for info - I can't recall off hand who proposed this, but carpini has been elevated to sp. status.

 
I actually read that last nig
I actually read that last night. Nelson and Hespenheide elevated it to species in 1998. Just did not have time to get back to the comment I made. Thanks Phillip.

 
Thank you, Joshua.
I thought I might be hearing from you on this one :-)

 
Your welcome. The common name
Your welcome. The common name is Two-lined Chestnut Borer. Like the one you have, I have collected several of these from oak.

 
Very nice.
Great images, Jim. The two-lined chestnut borer has adapted well to other trees since its orignal host has gone virtually extinct....Also, some specimens of this species have the elytral vittae (stripes) largely obsolete. They seem to be quite common on trunks of dead, standing beech in my experience, but are very wary and fly off at the slightest hint of danger.

 
I guess I was lucky.
I got mine while its bones were soft ;-)

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