Identification, Images, & Information
For Insects, Spiders & Their Kin
For the United States & Canada
Clickable Guide
Moths Butterflies Flies Caterpillars Flies Dragonflies Flies Mantids Cockroaches Bees and Wasps Walkingsticks Earwigs Ants Termites Hoppers and Kin Hoppers and Kin Beetles True Bugs Fleas Grasshoppers and Kin Ticks Spiders Scorpions Centipedes Millipedes

Calendar
Upcoming Events

Photos of insects and people from the 2015 gathering in Wisconsin, July 10-12

Photos of insects and people from the 2014 gathering in Virginia, June 4-7.

Photos of insects and people from the 2013 gathering in Arizona, July 25-28

Photos of insects and people from the 2012 gathering in Alabama

Photos of insects and people from the 2011 gathering in Iowa

Photos from the 2010 Workshop in Grinnell, Iowa

Photos from the 2009 gathering in Washington

TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Photo#50137
Psocid - Cerobasis annulata

Psocid - Cerobasis annulata
San Pedro, Los Angeles County, California, USA
April 30, 2006
Size: 1.84 mm
I found this in my house on the window sill in the kitchen. I'm curious what it is, and what it was doing there (i.e. what does it eat?)

But I don't know how to go about identifying an insect like this. It's miniscule — in the photo, 1 pixel = 4.92 microns. I put it on a piece of paper for photographing.

Images of this individual: tag all
Psocid - Cerobasis annulata Psocid - Cerobasis annulata

Cerobasis annulata (Hagen)
Ed Mockford det.
His comment: "Note long winglets with brown spotting. This is a domestic sp., rare in North America. Probably established now in households of coastal California."

Moved from Cerobasis.

Moved

Cerobasis, probably annulata
Cerobasis, probably annulata.

Moved

Reminds us of
springtails, in the guide here but we could be totally off. Great image! Someone will know.

 
Thanks!
And indeed, the springtails do bear quite a resemblence. But I don't think it's a springtail, because they have internal mouthparts and my specimin's mandibles are quite visible... and it didn't jump once during captivity.

 
psocid ? (maybe nymph)

 
Yes!
Wow, that's a dead ringer for it! Thanks a bunch.

It's funny, the first thing that came to mind when I saw it was "louse". But when I looked up images of lice on bugguide, the wings threw me off... when I looked, no nymphs showed up.

Still, I'd quite like to narrow it down a bit more. The number of antenna segments indicates it is a member of Troctomorpha, no?

 
My first thought
I agree...i dont know much about these little things but i think thats what we are looking at as well.

Comment viewing options
Select your preferred way to display the comments and click 'Save settings' to activate your changes.