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Photo#508450
Chlaenius from Wisconsin - Chlaenius tricolor

Chlaenius from Wisconsin - Chlaenius tricolor
Yorkville, Racine County, Wisconsin, USA
April 23, 2011
Size: 12mm
Found under very old piece of log.

Images of this individual: tag all
Chlaenius from Wisconsin - Chlaenius tricolor Chlaenius from Wisconsin - Chlaenius tricolor

Moved
Moved from Chlaenius tricolor.

Moved

Chlaenius tricolor
makes sense. Nice find considering Spring weather is very late this year in Wisconsin.

 
Thanks for the ID, Peter
Is that debris on the distal abdomen? Or tips of wings?

I'm not a beetle person....is there anyway to tell male from female?

And what is the difference between C. tricolor and C. tricolor tricolor?

 
Vestiture beneath dilated protarsi signifies male sex
in Chlaenius and in many, but not all, carabid genera. In your image the vestiture appears as a fuzzy "brush" and the front tarsi do indeed appear relatively expanded. Sex separation is of course easier when the tips ("prongs") of their genitalia happen to be partially exposed at the posterior ends of the abdomen. One (long) prong bearing to beetle's left means male, a symmetrical pair of (short) left and right prongs signifies female.

Subspecies C. tricolor tricolor occurs throughout North America except in far west where C. tricolor vigilans takes over. When dealing with the nominate form (also known as "sensu stricto"), taxonomist often use the abbreviated name, in this case "C. tricolor", in informal discussions.

White spots are debris. Perhaps today, thoughts of white bunnies were working in your subconscious. Have a good one.

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