Identification, Images, & Information
For Insects, Spiders & Their Kin
For the United States & Canada

Genus Timema


Phasmids of North America
[cite:383492]
i couldn't find the compiler of the info provided on that page of the herper.com project, but it contains state faunal lists that may prove useful; please let me know if you have an idea of what source[s] those lists are likely based upon and how reliable they are [e.g., the list for TX contains 15 spp. vs. 16 listed in a trusted source(1)]

Texas Walkingstick Information, by Mike Quinn
[cite:383412]
A part of Mike's ambitious Texas Entomology web project, this page provides a TX faunal list (16 spp., 6 genera, 2 families), links to some photos, online resources, and bibliography (with an emphasis on medical aspects)

Brock P.D. Phasmida species file online. Version 5.0

Conle O., Hennemann F. (2000-2013) phasmatodea.com -- The world of stick insects
[cite:383402]
A rich source of info on Phasmida

Insects Unlocked
[cite:1638831

We are the Insects Unlocked project at the University of Texas at Austin.

Based in the UT Insect Collection (UTIC) at Brackenridge Field Laboratory (BFL), part of the Department of Integrative Biology, we produce insect imagery for the public domain.

American Insects
Image galleries and some data, covering insects that are found in North, Central, and South American, including the Caribbean.

Tropicos
[cite:1286620 ]

Link

All of the nomenclatural, bibliographic, and specimen data accumulated in Missouri Botanical Garden's (MBG) electronic databases during the past 30 years are publicly available here. This system has nearly 1.3 million scientific names and over 4.4 million specimen records.

Great resource for plant distribution beyond US & Canada.

C.A. Triplehorn Insect Collection (OSUC)
[cite:1185947

The collection holds more than 3.5 million insect specimens and is one of the largest university insect collections in the world. All groups of insects are represented in the collection, and we are recognized for our holdings of leafhoppers (Cicadellidae), beetles (Coleoptera), and true flies (Diptera).

The Triplehorn Insect Collection is housed within the Museum of Biological Diversity, located on the West Campus of the Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio.

On 29 April, 2005, the Ohio State Insect Collection was renamed in honor of Dr. Charles A. Triplehorn, Professor of Entomology and Curator at OSU between 1962 and 1992.