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Photo#509474
Lesser Maple Leaf Blotch Miner - Hodges#0765 - Phyllonorycter lucidicostella

Lesser Maple Leaf Blotch Miner - Hodges#0765 - Phyllonorycter lucidicostella
Marlton, Burlington County, New Jersey, USA
April 25, 2011
Came to the light at night

But maybe closer to Bob's unidentified Phyllocnictis here http://mothphotographersgroup.msstate.edu/species.php?hodges=854.97

Edit: Email from Terry Harrison
"The moth in BG photo 509474 is a species of Phyllonorycter, not Phyllocnistis. The most immediately conclusive evidence of this is the fact that the moth has a prominent tuft on its head (look very closely, and you'll see it), which Phyllocnistis never has. Also, the dark area at the apex of the forewing encompasses the black spot, rather than running into the center of it as is the tendency in Phyllocnistis. Also, there is no bifid V-shaped tuft at the very apex of the forewing, as is seen in Phyllocnistis. As to which species of Phyllonorycter this is, it is not P. clemensella, because there is a dark stripe near the costa, running from the base of the wing out to where it meets the basal-most costal bar (clemensella lacks any hint of this stripe, so that the basal part of the forewing is uniformly white). Based on the forewing markings, my best guess would be that this moth is Phyllonorycter lucidicostella."

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