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Photo#51193
Whatzit - Chauliodes rastricornis

Whatzit - Chauliodes rastricornis
Nashua, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, USA
May 7, 2006
Size: about 30 mm
I've got a jillion images to sort, fiddle with and post, but no, I had to veer off the road on the way to the grocery store and poke around in a small wooded area, finding MORE stuff to photograph, including this pupa of a what? It was in a soft soggy stump of an aspen I think. (I mean I know for sure it was there, I just don't know my trees all that well.)

Whatever this is, I hope it doesn't land on my neck and I swat it, because it looks like it might swat back!

Images of this individual: tag all
Whatzit - Chauliodes rastricornis Whatzit - Chauliodes rastricornis Whatzit - Chauliodes rastricornis Whatzit - Chauliodes rastricornis Whatzit - Chauliodes rastricornis - male Whatzit - Chauliodes rastricornis - male Whatzit - Chauliodes rastricornis - male Whatzit - Chauliodes rastricornis - male Fishfly exuvia - Chauliodes rastricornis - male Fishfly exuvia - Chauliodes rastricornis - male

Fishfly pupa
Illustrations or keys for pupae are few and far between. However, this illustration from Aquatic Insects Of North America by R.W. Merritt and K. W. Cummings from page 301 fig 16.7 of a Neohermes sp. pupa, which I flipped horizontally to facilitate comparison with your photo, is strikingly similar.

www.FlyfishingEntomology.com

 
Probably right,
but I think I'll wait & see if I can get an ID from the adult form. Pupa's darkening and still lively.

 
Pupariam
That's really exciting. What type of environment have you provided it in which to pupate? If you are recording times and observations, perhaps you'd be willing to share them along with any supsequent photos following final metamorphosis.

www.FlyfishingEntomology.com

 
It's eclosed!
I'll shoot imago and pupal exuvia in the morning. I kept it in a sealed tupperware container with several beetles and some pulpy rotted wood shreds. I figured it would get enough air by me peeking at it every day. I don't think I had checked it since Friday evening.

 
Chauloiedes
Appears to be either Chauliodes pecticornis or C. rastricornis.

www.FlyfishingEntomology.com

 
With yours, that's 2 1/2 votes for rasticornis.
That's where I've moved it. Thank you, Roger.

Megalopteran Pupa
Hey,
This is definitely a pupating Megalopteran of some kind. Given the size, my guess is that it is a Nigronia or Chauliodes. I'm sure that you'll find out soon, because you are absolutely awesome at rearing larval insects.

 
Thank you, Crystal.
I thought it looked like Megalotera, but I knew nothing of their life cycle other than some vague, no doubt mistaken, notion that their larvae were all aquatic.

 
Terrestrial Pupae
I think that their larvae are all aquatic. However, when they are ready to pupate the larvae crawl on land, dig a hole, and remain there for several weeks as a pre-pupa. Then they pupate in that same hole underground.

 
Ahh, that makes sense.
There was a small pond 20 - 30 feet away.

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