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Photo#51338
Mating beetles - Lasioderma haemorrhoidale - male - female

Mating beetles - Lasioderma haemorrhoidale - Male Female
Peters Canyon, Orange, Orange County, California, USA
April 18, 2006
Size: approx. 5mm
Found along dusty trail, about a foot off the ground, on the underside of a leaf.

Images of this individual: tag all
Mating beetles - Lasioderma haemorrhoidale - male - female Mating beetles - Lasioderma haemorrhoidale - male - female

Moved
Moved from Xyletininae.

I had tried to find a match within your native fauna, but in vain. Now I came across a note (see info page) that supplied the clue to this beetles!

 
Thanks so much for your continuing efforts.
I never thought this would get an ID to species. Thanks again, Boris. The note proved interesting.

Moved

Moved
Moved from Beetles.

Anobiidae, subfamily Xyletininae
insofar the case is done - but lasts to reach genus level.

I´d say: Lasioderma - if not were the size given, definitely too big for that genus.

I´ll try again later.

Boris

 
Ever deeper in your debt
Boris, am I glad to meet you on Bug Guide! You're a major asset and a real help to me.

I might well be wrong on length and, if so, beetle would be smaller than the 5mm I mentioned. (I base this partly on looking again at the leaf.)

Anobiidae?
The shape of the pronotum (top of the thorax), and the way the head is hidden beneath it, suggest something in the family Anobiidae. The antennae are pretty 'regular' though, and anobiids usually have some distinctive segments on their antennae.

 
Will check to see if I've got a better solo shot
Maybe that will add some clarity. I sat on this for a while - ouch! - since I didn't think there was much to go on.

(Written later. Here's the solo shot; hope it helps.)

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