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Photo#51442
Unknown family - Orthoperus scutellaris

Unknown family - Orthoperus scutellaris
Nashua, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, USA
May 5, 2006
Size: 1.1 mm
This shot best shows the antennal club configuation. The beetle held this pose, drinking from a water droplet, for several shots. That's a trick I often use to get hyperactive beetles to hold still so I can focus on them.

Images of this individual: tag all
Unknown family - Orthoperus scutellaris Unknown family - Orthoperus scutellaris Unknown family - Orthoperus scutellaris Unknown family - Orthoperus scutellaris tiny corylophid - Orthoperus scutellaris

Corylophidae: Orthoperus scutellaris
I am familiar with this species, otherwise the pictures would give me trouble. Size, body form, antennal form, color all lead to this genus, and only one common species has been found in NH.

 
Family fits, as I now see.
This beetle does bear strong similarity to the corylophid I posted last year. Thank you, Don.

 
Are you sure?
Isn't the head much too exposed to be a Corylophidae? In the Sericoderus you previously posted there is at least the hint of a poorly developed pronotal hood or shelf in that you can't see the head behind the eyes whereas in this beetle you can see the entire head back to the neck. Plus it's so shiny. I was still leaning towards the Phalacridae. Definitely a neat little beetle.

 
Sericoderus is indeed different in appearance.
Sericoderus does have the pronotum much broader and curved , while Orthoperus has the head much more easily visible. The two genera are in different subfamilies, and more or less represent the two extremes in form for this family.

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