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Photo#515744
Twice-stabbed lady beetles - Chilocorus stigma - male - female

Twice-stabbed lady beetles - Chilocorus stigma - Male Female
Pelham, Hampshire County, Massachusetts, USA
April 17, 2011
I wanted to double-check on species for these... I'm having a hard time separating Chilocorus stigma from C. kuwanae. There were dozens of these on some beech trees, apparently attracted to the Cryptococcus fagisuga scales that were all over the bark.

Images of this individual: tag all
Twice-stabbed lady beetles - Chilocorus stigma - male - female Twice-stabbed lady beetle - Chilocorus stigma Twice-stabbed lady beetle - Chilocorus stigma

Argh!
And you didn't take any pictures of the scales? We have none in the guide. So give us some next year and let me know so I add them to the non-natives.

 
Well...
I have an old, non-macro shot. I uploaded it as a placeholder... feel free to add info to the guide page!

Moved
Moved from Twice-stabbed Lady Beetles.
Thanks! Nice to see native insects adapting to feed on an exotic pest.

C. stigma
It's a little hard to see the full outline of the spots because of their, shall we say, activities, but the female and middle male have the rounded spots of C. stigma. The last male's spots are a little more angular, but not as straight-edged as C. kuwanae, and I think we can also judge him by the company he's keeping!

 
twice stabbed alright
:)

 
how did I know...
...that you'd have something to say about this? ;)

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