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Species Sympetrum rubicundulum - Ruby Meadowhawk

Ruby Meadowhawk - Sympetrum rubicundulum - male Ruby Meadowhawk - Sympetrum rubicundulum - male Sympetrum - Sympetrum rubicundulum - male Ruby Meadowhawk - Sympetrum rubicundulum - male Ruby Meadowhawk - Sympetrum rubicundulum - female Female Meadowhawk - Based on Subgenital Plates is it Ruby or Cherry-Faced? - Sympetrum rubicundulum Ruby Meadowhawk - Sympetrum rubicundulum - male Ruby Meadowhawk - Sympetrum rubicundulum - male
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Odonata (Dragonflies and Damselflies)
Suborder Anisoptera (Dragonflies)
Family Libellulidae (Skimmers)
Genus Sympetrum (Meadowhawks)
Species rubicundulum (Ruby Meadowhawk)
Size
1.3"
Identification
Males may be recognizable by shape of hamuli, but see comments by Steve here . rubicundulum and internum may be conspecific; see HERE
Range
Recent work by Mike Blust suggests that this species is not found in New England.
Habitat
A variety of wetlands including ponds (often temporary), marshes, bogs, and sluggish streams. Often in fields and clearings far from water. (1)
Season
Late summer - fall
Food
predaceous on other insects
See Also
Cherry-faced Meadowhawk - Males in the east can only be distinguished by the shape of the hamuli; a ventral view is the best for distinguishing them, as the shape of the dorsolateral lobe is the most noticeable difference (roughly triangular in shape on Cherry-faced, scoop-shaped on Ruby). Females can be distinguished by a close-up view of the subgenital plates.
White-faced Meadowhawk - Males distinguished by clean white face (Ruby Meadowhawks can have a dirty white face, but it is never bright, clean white like on White-faced). Females can only be distinguished by a close-up view of the subgenital plates.
Print References
"Stokes Beginner's Guide to Dragonflies", pages 144-145 (1)
Works Cited
1.Stokes Beginner's Guide to Dragonflies
Donald and Lillian Stokes. 2002. Little, Brown and Company.