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Photo#521840
Unknown eggs found in trashline spider web. - Anicla infecta

Unknown eggs found in trashline spider web. - Anicla infecta
Austin, Travis County, Texas, USA
May 29, 2011
Size: 0.6mm
Eggs apparently woven into main support line of orb weaver.


I included images of the overall egg mass, both ends, and the middle. I included both ends because the weave appears different at each end. I'm not sure if that's significant.

Images of this individual: tag all
Unknown eggs found in trashline spider web. - Anicla infecta Unknown eggs found in trashline spider web - Anicla infecta Unknown eggs found in trashline spider web - Anicla infecta Unknown eggs found in trashline spider web - Anicla infecta Unknown eggs found in trashline spider web - Anicla infecta Day 1 - hatchling caterpillars in trashline spider web - Anicla infecta Day 1 - hatchling caterpillars in trashline spider web - Anicla infecta Day 6 - Caterpillar#1 - Anicla infecta Day 6 - Caterpillar#1 - Anicla infecta Day 6 - Caterpillar#1 - Anicla infecta Day 6 - Caterpillar#2 - Anicla infecta Day 11 -- Caterpillar A - Anicla infecta Day 11 -- Caterpillar A - Anicla infecta Day 11 -- Caterpillar A - Anicla infecta Day 11 -- Caterpillar B - Anicla infecta Day 11 -- Caterpillar C - Anicla infecta Day 11 -- Caterpillar D - Anicla infecta Day 11 -- Caterpillar E - Anicla infecta Day 17 -- Caterpillar A - Anicla infecta Day 17 -- Caterpillar A - Anicla infecta Day 17 -- Caterpillar B - Anicla infecta Day 17 -- Caterpillar C - Anicla infecta Day 17 -- Caterpillar C - Anicla infecta Day 17 -- Caterpillar E - Anicla infecta Day 17 -- Caterpillar E - Anicla infecta Day 17 -- Caterpillar D - Anicla infecta Day 21 -- Caterpillar A - Anicla infecta Day 21 -- Caterpillar B - Anicla infecta Day 21 -- Caterpillar C - Anicla infecta Day 21 -- Caterpillar C - Anicla infecta Day 21 -- Caterpillar E - Anicla infecta Day 21 -- Caterpillar D - Anicla infecta Pupa C - Anicla infecta Pupa D - Anicla infecta Pupa D - Anicla infecta Pupating Caterpillar E - Anicla infecta Pupating Caterpillar E - Anicla infecta Anicla infecta - moth C - Anicla infecta Anicla infecta - moth C - Anicla infecta Anicla infecta - moth C - Anicla infecta Anicla infecta - pupa D - Anicla infecta Anicla infecta - pupa E - Anicla infecta

Pupa Color
I think it's interesting noting the color change in the pupae.

Moved
Moved from Noctuoidea.

R.I.P Caterpillar A
Sometime within the past day or so, caterpillar A bit the dust. Its body turned into a liquefied mess. I'm guessing it was a fatal bacterial infection.

 
Boy to I feel stupid!
In order to prevent the infection from spreading to the others, I was going to sterilize the container containing caterpillar A. Unfortunately, the container for caterpillar A served as the lid for the container of caterpillar B, which escaped while I was doing the sterilizing. So now I have only three left.

I thought two of them looked like they might be pupating, so I added some material (basically ground up coconut coir) for them to hide in if they want. The other one looks just like normal except it's very big. I hope at least one of them makes it.

I remember the first time I did something like this was with huge caterpillars that were eating our papaya trees in Guatemala. They pupated alright, but the pupae died, so we never found out what they were. All I remember is that they were huge.

Similar to this
Seems similar to this one (but not an exact match).

 
Green Cutworm

Color of caterpillars
I'm struck by the variety of colors among these siblings, and perhaps even in an individual over time. If someone knows something about this, please comment. I don't think I've ever heard of caterpillars changing color before. Changing color from instar to instar makes sense I guess, and I expect there is some variability among individuals.

 
Not unusual
Butterflies and moths that I've reared did change color between instars. Here's a life history for another moth species. Then, for moths, the last-instar caterpillars stopped eating and faded to white during the three days or so before pupating.

 
Thanks
Your color variation seems to compare favorably with what I'm seeing.

Identifying caterpillar individuals
On the pictures identified with numbers, the numbers are used simply to indicate they are separate animals. On the pictures where letters of the alphabet are used, the same individual will always be identified with the same letter. This way, I hope it will be possible to compare the development among several individuals.

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

 
Database search
Well, that narrows it down to 136 species unless you have a host-plant association hitherto undiscovered. The grass family is Gramineae.

HOSTS search: Noctuidae + Gramineae

Titles of pictures in series
As suggested, I've changed the titles of the pictures. For subsequent pictures, I will do like I've done on the more recent ones and label individual caterpillars. This will not be consistent from day to day, since I'm not good enough to be able to recognize each individual as it grows up. Already, I see a size difference, though, so I think it might be a good idea to label individuals when possible.

Video
Here's a video of the hatchlings. You may want to turn the sound down. The sound is my air conditioner. I think it's funny how unfazed they are by the wind.

OK. I'd like to watch these g
OK. I'd like to watch these guys grow up, but the question is, what do they eat? They're on a spider web on a wooden fence. There's nothing to eat for about 2 metres.

 
Well, in trying to shelter th
Well, in trying to shelter them from the wind, I ended up accidentally knocking the web down, so I took their section of web into the house. Almost as soon as I did that, they started dropping, suspending from their own webs. Even the "still" air of the house wafted them around.

Frantic to keep them contained I rushed to get a butterfly keeper. I put them in there, but the netting it's made of is too coarse. They could easily walk right through. So I put the whole thing in a plastic bag. I'll be collecting some various foodstuffs for them now.

Moth eggs maybe?
These eggs appear to be woven into the web of what I assume is a species of cyclosa. I thought egg sacks were woven into the trash line of species in this genus, though, so I have my doubts that these eggs belong to the spider. Also, spider eggs are usually spherical, and these are grooved. But what insect in its right might would lay eggs in a spider web?

 
I think moths
Butterflies don't lay that many eggs in one place as far as I know. I find butterfly eggs singly and moth eggs in groups. (I know about as much entomology as your profile page says you do.) By now, the number of prolegs on the caterpillars can help a few people on this site narrow down the taxon; not me, though, except that these aren't geometrids.

If some of your specimens survive to adulthood, you'll have a life-cycle series to announce in the Focus Groups forum. When rearing insects indoors, it's best to keep them in a part of the house that stays as close as possible to outdoor temperatures, barring freezing. And change the date when you post new photos: use the date the photo was taken.

 
Sorry for the late reply. I d
Sorry for the late reply. I didn't notice your comment about laying eggs in groups. Your characterization of butterflies laying eggs singly is incorrect. Just look up cabbage butterfly eggs for example. This is probably the first kind of butterfly I ever witnessed laying eggs (I was probably 4 or 5 years old). They are laid in large clusters.

 
Cabbage butterfly
Hello again, after eight years! I'd forgotten about this page. The cabbage butterflies in my yard still lay one egg at a time. They may lay many in succession, but I don't recall ever finding two on a single leaf. Sorry to contradict you, but that's my experience. I regularly find their eggs on radish leaves and set cuttings in an outdoor terrarium for rearing. Two specimens are currently pupating there.

 
Having only seen examples of
Having only seen examples of single egg laying does not make evidence that it is universally so. Finding a single example, though, of a cluster, does serve as an effective counterexample, disproving the rule. Note I'm not saying they always lay in clusters. I'm saying they don't always lay singly. I know this because I've seen them lay in clusters. A quick search as I suggested backs up this assertion.

This article goes into some detail of various cluster strategies.
https://www.learnaboutbutterflies.com/Lifecycle.htm

 
You're both right
Most butterflies lay eggs singly, but Pieris rapae does sometimes lay eggs in large clusters, as a quick Google search will show. I personally have only found P. rapae eggs laid singly, so I'm inclined to think that's more common.

 
I googled grooved insect eggs
I googled grooved insect eggs, and the first image link showed eggs that looked substantially like mine. There was a link to follow if you wanted to see what they hatched into. Here is that link.

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