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Species Dynamine postverta - Four-spotted Sailor - Hodges#4534.1

Four-spotted Sailor  - Dynamine postverta - female Four-spotted Sailor  - Dynamine postverta Four-spotted Sailor - Dynamine postverta - female Four-spotted Sailor - Dynamine postverta - female Four-spotted Sailor - Dynamine postverta - female
Show images of: caterpillars · adults · both
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Lepidoptera (Butterflies and Moths)
Superfamily Papilionoidea (Butterflies and Skippers)
Family Nymphalidae (Brush-footed Butterflies)
Subfamily Biblidinae (Tropical Brushfoots)
Tribe Ageroniini
Genus Dynamine (Sailors)
Species postverta (Four-spotted Sailor - Hodges#4534.1)
Hodges Number
4534.1
Other Common Names
Mexican Greenwing, Mexican Sailor
Synonyms and other taxonomic changes
Syn: mylitta (Cramer, 1779)
Explanation of Names
Dynamine postverta (Cramer, 1779)
Common name from the four black spots on the upperside of the male's forewing (I think).
Numbers
2 spp. n. of Mex.
Identification
Extremely similar to the Blue-eyed Sailor (D. dyonis), though larger. Female has three distinct white stripes across the upperside of the hindwings, vs. just one in the Blue-eyed. Male upperwing is bluer and has four black spots near the forewing apex.
Range
s. TX (as a stray) to C. Amer. / Cuba - Map - (MPG, BOA)
Remarks
First U.S. Records: December 3 2005, at the NABA National Butterfly Center; and December 7 2005, at Bentsen-Rio Grande Valley State Park. (Bordelon & Knudson 2006)
Print References
Bordelon, C. & E. Knudson. 2006. Three New USA Butterfly Records (Pieridae, Nymphalidae) from the Lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas. News of the Lepidopterists' Society, 48(1): 3-6.