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Photo#528134
Black cantharid - Dichelotarsus laevicollis

Black cantharid - Dichelotarsus laevicollis
Mt. Greylock summit, Adams, Berkshire County, Massachusetts, USA
June 10, 2011
Berkshire BioBlitz

Images of this individual: tag all
Black cantharid - Dichelotarsus laevicollis Black cantharid - Dichelotarsus laevicollis

Moved

Another opinion
I just gave Georges Pelletier permission to use this photo in a virtual key to the Cantharidae of Northeastern America in the online journal CJAI (Canadian Journal of Arthropod Identification) -- but he says it is Dichelotarsus laevicollis -- so a difference in opinion taxonomically as well as with the specific ID.

Moved
Moved from Malthacus.

Podabrus puberulus LeConte
This is Podabrus puberulus LeConte, a very common and characteristic species in the northeast. Note the all black colouration and the narrow, shiny glabrous pronotum with the pale apical corners. These rufous apical corners can vary from covering almost all of the apical angle in the explanate portion of the elytra, to being only a very small spot at the extreme apex. It looks rather similar in overall appearance to Podabrus laevicollis (Kirby), however, in P. laevicollis the pronotum is entirely a dark testaceous to piceous, never showing the pale apical front angle of the pronotum chacateristic of P. puberulus..

 
ha! feeling vindicated...
thanks a ton, Kristof.

i give up :(
i've managed to rule out every single ne. sp. treated in D&A & UNH DB, the 'least ineligible' one being puberulus LeC.

 
Hmm...
Are there any dorsal/lateral details that would help? Should this still stay in Malthacus? Thanks for all the effort.

cool; those goth jobs seem uncommon in the east
Moved from Beetles.

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