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Photo#535808
Aphids in Oregon - Oestlundiella flava

Aphids in Oregon - Oestlundiella flava
Mt. Hood, Oregon, USA
July 28, 2010
Size: <1cm
Different sizes (instars?) of same insect. Resembles aphid, but can't figure out which one.

Moved
Moved from Euceraphis mucida.

Oregon alder aphid
I have only just noticed this. I think that you will find that your Oregon alder aphid is likely to be Oestlundiella flava(Davidson). See http://www.aphidsonworldsplants.info/d_APHIDS_O.htm#Oestlundiella

Moved
Moved from Aphids.

Comment by John Pearson
"Alder species. There are four species of alder in Oregon, but the bi-colored leaves with a slightly revolute margin suggest this is Red Alder (Alnus rubra)." John Pearson.

Yes, they are different instars. The winged one is an adult, the others are nymphs (2 instars at least); you can see the wing buds.

We have Euceraphis
here but no mucida yet. Maybe Vassili will be able to help with this.

Moved for expert attention
Moved from ID Request.

 
Today I received an email....
from Colin Favret of http://www.aphidnet.org/ (Its primary goal is to inquire into the evolution of aphids, including their classification and modes of speciation. )
"Hi Karen.

It's probably Euceraphis mucida (Fitch). Normally the species feeds on Betula rather than Alnus, but the description fits, and I've seen it on other non-Betula species (such as Amelanchier). If you see it again, please send me some individuals in alcohol!

Best regards,
Colin
Colin Favret
Université de Montréal
Biodiversity Centre"

 
http://www.aphidsonworldsplants.info/x_APHIDS_E.htm
This website describes the Euceraphis mucida.

"Euceraphis mucida (Fitch) Adult viviparae are pale green to yellow-green with an orange-brown thorax and dark tibiae coated with blue-grey wax..."

 
Trillium Lake at foothill of Mt. Hood
I have more photos of the insects/bush/tree, if needed.

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