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TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Photo#536393
Leafhopper? - Homalodisca vitripennis

Leafhopper? - Homalodisca vitripennis
Tallahassee, Leon County, Florida, USA
June 28, 2011
Size: approx. 1/4 inch
Could this be another species close to/in Homalodica? This one had no red patches and the eye color is different from the one I submitted a few minutes ago.

Sorry for sending in too many pics for ID. I really appreciate what the bug guide and all its experts are doing.

Images of this individual: tag all
Leafhopper? - Homalodisca vitripennis Leafhopper? - Homalodisca vitripennis

Moved

Homalodisca vitripennis
a color variety

 
Red Pigments
I just came across an Article on the "Age determination of the glassy-winged sharpshooter, Homalodisca vitripennis, using wing pigmentation" (C. Timmons et al. J. Insect Sci., 11, 78, 2011). I am citing from the abstract "(The red and brown) pigments are believed to be pheomelanin and eumelanin, respectively. The age of H. vitripennis can be determined by calculating the amount of red pigment found in the wings (...)". And this link states that the final immature stage has red pigments that darken over the sharpshooter's lifespan and eventually become brown/dark. Cool stuff.

Moved for expert attention
Moved from ID Request.

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